Ad Law Insights - Legal and Regulatory Updates

Latest FTC and state attorneys general compliance, investigation and enforcement developments of concern to advertisers and marketers

FTC May Soon Be Updating Its Dot-Com Disclosure Guidelines

By Richard Newman | October 4, 2022
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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently requested comments on potential updates to its 2013 FTC Dot Com Disclosure Guidance: How to Make Effective Disclosures in Digital Advertising.  Generally speaking, the purposes of the Guidance is to provide information to digital advertisers in order to comply with the law.

The FTC Act’s prohibition on “unfair or deceptive acts or practices” encompasses online advertising, marketing, and sales.  In addition, many FTC rules and Guides are not limited to any particular medium used to disseminate claims or advertising, and therefore.

The Guidance sets forth instructions on avoiding express and implied deceptive statements.  It also provides guidance regarding disclosures, including what to incorporate into the underlying claim, ensuring that disclosures are “clear and conspicuous,” what to consider with video and audio disclosures, taking account of the various devices and platforms consumers may use to view advertising, how to approach space-constrained ads, what constitutes permissible  use of hyperlinks, evaluating technological limitations or unique characteristics of  communications methods,

The FTC plans to increase investigation and enforcement within the digital marketing industry.  The agency is also seeking input on “dark pattern” tactics and advertising used to deceive  consumers, as well as automatic renewal subscriptions and free trials, social media advertising, online marketplaces and lead generation referrals.

“We know that some companies are wrongly citing our current guides to justify dark patterns and other forms of digital deception,” said FTC attorney Samuel Levine, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.  “We are looking to update the guides to make clear that online tricks and traps will not be tolerated,

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Tips on Substantiating “Up To” Claims

By Richard Newman | October 1, 2022
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“Up to” representations in promotional materials often draw regulatory and private plaintiff scrutiny insofar as whether such claims are truthful and can be properly substantiated.  Which begs the question … how can an advertiser lawfully substantiate “up to” claims?

The answer?

It may depend upon various factors, including, but not limited to, the context in which the “up to” claim is made, whether the claim is unqualified, and whether applicable conditions, limitations, exclusions and restrictions have been appropriately disclosed.  It may also depend upon whether the matter involves the Federal Trade Commission, state attorneys general or a private plaintiff false advertising lawsuit.  And/or, upon the forum in which the legal or regulatory matter has been initiated, such as state court, federal court or the National Advertising Division.  Consumer perception testing prior to disseminating such claims can also be a useful tool when combating false advertising claims.

For example, at least one federal court has appeared to apply a “ceiling” test.  Would reasonable consumers understand such language to be a floor rather than a ceiling that can be achieved under limited circumstances?  Do the claims expressly or implied promise the best, maximum result?    Is it implausible that reasonable consumers would be deceived?  Would reasonable consumers understand such language to be a guarantee?  Would reasonable consumers understand such language to be a promise?

Now, consider the National Advertising Division.

The NAD often considers whether an “appreciable number” of consumers actually achieve the top range of the claimed benefit under circumstances normally and expectably encountered by consumers. 

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NAD Concerns About Trustpilot Ratings Methodology

By Richard Newman | October 1, 2022
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In 2019 and in response to a competitor challenge, the National Advertising Division ruled on the “#1 Rated” claim made by TaxSlayer LLC in its promotional messages.  In doing so, the NAD recommended that TaxSlayer discontinue the unsubstantiated representation.

More specifically, the claims at issue included “Slay your taxes. So you can enjoy your refund.  Maximize your refund with TaxSlayer.  #1 rated on Trustpilot” and “#1 Rated in the Tax Prep Software Category on Trustpilot.  Start free today!”

Theer was a disclosure that stated that the foregoing claims were “based on more than 2300 verified customer reviews on Trustpilot.  TaxSlayer has 1500+ 5-star reviews, and 84% of TaxSlayer customers rate TaxSlayer Great or Excellent on Trustpilot.  Learn more at trustpilot.com/review/taxslayer.”

The NAD opined that for “#1 Rated” claims, advertisers should compare themselves with at least 85% of the applicable marketplace, and the consumers surveyed should represent a broad base of customers that used the product.

According to the NAD, TaxSlayer did not satisfy such requirements because the population of online reviews that created the basis for Trustpilot’s score allegedly failed to represent the general opinion of tax preparation software consumers across the United States.  The NAD also rejected TaxSlayer’s argument that a consumer could simply visit the Trustpilot website to clarify any confusion about its ranking.

“Consumers should not have to search to learn more about the limitations on an advertising claim,” said the NAD.  “Here, while the claim informs consumers that it is limited to companies in the tax prep software category on a certain website,

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The Art of Responding to an FTC Civil Investigative Demand (CID)

By Richard Newman | September 30, 2022
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Federal Trade Commision (FTC) investigation and litigation defense attorney Richard B. Newman has written an authoritative article on JD Supra for digital marketers and FTC practice counsel.  JD Supra is a need-to-know news, insights and intelligence source that publishes and distributes valuable content produced by thought leading experts on myriad topics across numerous industries and fields, including advertising legal regulatory matters.

The article examines, in depth, the purpose of FTC civil investigative demands (CIDs), considerations relating to the nature substance of the initial response and subsequent responses, defense strategies, how to evaluate whether the recipient is a “target,” the importance of the “meet and confer” process, liability exposure and business disruption minimization tactics, persuasive written advocacy submissions, lodging objections to a CID, petitions to limit or quash, enforcement action avoidance and monetary fine minimization, how to avoid negative publicity, investigation closure and how to achieve an optimal resolution.

The article covers numerous steps that CID recipients should consider prior to, during and after learning that they are the subject of an FTC investigation.

You can read the article titled The Art of Responding to an FTC CID by an FTC CID Lawyer on JD Supra, here.  An article authored by FTC lawyer Richard B. Newman titled Considerations for Digital Marketers When Selecting Regulatory Investigation Defense Counsel is also available on JD Supra, here.

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About This Blog and Hinch Newman’s Advertising + Marketing Practice

Hinch Newman LLP’s advertising and marketing practice includes successfully resolving some of the highest-profile Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and state attorneys general digital advertising and telemarketing investigations and enforcement actions. The firm possesses superior knowledge and deep legal experience in the areas of advertising, marketing, lead generation, promotions, e-commerce, privacy and intellectual property law. Through these advertising and marketing law updates, Hinch Newman provides commentary, news and analysis on issues and trends concerning developments of interest to digital marketers, including FTC and state attorneys general compliance, civil investigative demands (CIDs), and administrative/judicial process. This blog is sponsored by Hinch Newman LLP.

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